Image Courtesy of the Artist
Slightly, 2014
Porcelain, white earthenware, steel & acrylic medium

 

The University of Arkansas Department of Art is pleased to announce Noise., the MFA Thesis Exhibition of Laura Polaski. The exhibition will be on display from April 16 – 26, 2015 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The Department of Art will host a reception on Friday, April 24th at 5:30pm in the Fine Arts Center Gallery.

Noise. considers the interruption of fear and trauma on individuals during their pursuit of pleasure and excitement. By utilizing the physicality of materials to reflect human figures, emotions, and the vulnerability of living things, Polaski’s drawings and sculp- tures capture the effects of struggle. Artwork featured in the exhibition strives to conjure the subjectivity of experienced emotions. Textures, colors, and materials are exploited to create an environment where the viewer simultaneously experiences serenity and violence, as well as delight and grief.

Image Courtesy of the Artist
Snowglobe (1 of 1), 2015
Ceramic & Mixed Media

 

The University of Arkansas Department of Art is pleased to announce Breaking Wind, the MFA Thesis Exhibition of Todd Pentico. The exhibition will be on display from April 3 – 12, 2015 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The Department of Art will host a reception on Friday, April 10th at 5:30pm in the Fine Arts Center Gallery.

Breaking Wind documents the search for a biological connection between humans and place. Through the use of small ex- periments and observations, Pentico questions the ability to differentiate between reality and the virtual. By studying the places, events, and objects that generate a specific experience within the human psyche, Pentico attempts to understand the relationship between the natural and artificial. It is this duality that lies at the center of Pentico’s artwork.

Image Courtesy of the Artist
The House, 2014
Watercolor, gouache, graphite, charcoal & colored pencil on paper

 

The University of Arkansas Department of Art is pleased to announce Bryanna Jaramillo’s MFA Exhibition title What’s Left Over. The exhibition will be on display from March 16 – 27, 2015 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. There will be a reception held on Thursday, March 19th from 5:30 – 7:30pm at the Fine Arts Center Gallery.

What’s Left Over is a body of work that combines drawing, painting and sculpture to express a childlike idea for understanding reality through the lens of adulthood. Through the creation of an alternative world named Lola, I explore the balance of truth and fantasy. Imaginative play is translated into reality as I investigate the human desire for lamentation, the deep-set yearning for things past. What’s Left Over is a material culmination of the mental and spiritual, those moments that a person’s conscious has latched onto throughout their brief time on earth.

Images: Sarah McCormick (top left), Colleen Poplawski (top right), Kris Johnson (bottom left), & Zoe Eagan (bottom right)

 

The 2015 BFA Exhibition will be on display from March 2 – 12, 2015 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The Department of Art will host a reception on Friday, March 6th from 5:30 – 7:30P.M. at the Fine Arts Center Gallery.

The exhibition highlights the work of students from all disciplines, and represents a variety of approaches to making artwork. Over the course of their studies, students learn how to engage in both the fine art and professional markets by preparing a cohesive body of work. The exhibition includes the work of Beau Barnes, Zoe Eagan, Samantha Hussey, Kris Johnson, Sarah McCormick, Colleen Poplawski, and Michael Ramirez.

Barnes’ ceramic forms and creatures are inspired by popular culture and science fiction. Eagan operates within a feminist framework of gender neutrality, with a focus on the ‘pink epidemic’. Her ceramic works mock, embody, and challenge the status quo of a gendered society. Hussey’s interest in the underwater landscape and aquatic creatures are reflected in her sculptures and projections. Johnson uses a dry plate process to document conversations with individuals, retaining the photograph as an artifact of the event. In the final image, it is not the words spoken during the eight-minute capture that remains significant, but the document of the experience. McCormick’s sculptures navigate the landscape of childhood and familial experience. Her focus is on the inconsistencies of remembrance that frame our perceptions. Poplawski’s landscape paintings reflect our relationship with change and address the human condition. Ramirez’s prints relay memories, experiences, and moment in time. The final product is an image that intends to concretely materialize an experience or feeling, but has ultimately gained or lost information.

"Storm at Sea"

Radcliffe Bailey
Storm at Sea, 2007
Piano keys, African sculpture, model boat, paper, Acrylic, glitter, gold leaf
212 x 213 in.
© Radcliffe Bailey
Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, NY

 

 

Fayetteville, AR. – January 12, 2015 — The University of Arkansas Department of Art presents Radcliffe Bailey: Storm at Sea from January 26 – February 20 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The exhibition includes an artist lecture on Thursday, February 19th, at 5:30 p.m. in Room 206 in Hillside Auditorium. The Department of Art will host a reception on February 19th at the Fine Arts Center Gallery immediately following the lecture.

“The Department of Art at the University of Arkansas is thrilled to present the work of Radcliffe Bailey,” said Marc Mitchell, director of exhibitions for the Department. “Mr. Bailey is an internationally renowned artist whose work has been shown throughout the world. Its is wonderful to be able to share his work with community in Northwest Arkansas.”

Radcliffe Bailey: Storm at Sea, an exhibition curated by Cynthia Norse Thompson, considers themes of ancestry, race, and memory. Often working with found materials, Bailey deftly creates artwork that explores the relationship between past and present.  In his installation, Storm at Sea, Bailey utilizes objects such as piano keys, an African sculpture, and a glitter-covered ship to suggest leitmotifs associated with the black experience of the transatlantic slave trade. Keys, which are methodically arranged on the floor, create a engulfing visual experience that references waves of the ocean, splintered boards of a wrecked ship, and the bones of those slaves who lost their lives during the transatlantic journey. The result is an exhibition that questions the accuracy of recorded history through carefully culled objects and their connotations.

Images (Clockwise from top left): Kris Johnson, Paula Martin,
Raven McCarty, & Stephanie Wehmeyer.

 

Fayetteville, AR. – December 1, 2014 — The University of Arkansas Department of Art is pleased to announce a group exhibition Investigation of Person, Place, and Space by senior photography and ceramic student. The exhibition will be on display from December 12, 2014 – January 16, 2015 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The Department of Art will host a reception on January 16th at the Fine Arts Center Gallery at 5:30 pm.

The exhibition highlights the work of students in professional development courses, and represents a variety of approaches to photography and ceramics. Students enrolled learn how to engage in both the fine art and professional markets by preparing a cohesive body of work, creating a website to showcase their work, and managing a successful career in the contemporary art world. The exhibition includes the work of Kris Johnson, Paula Martin, Raven McCarty, and Stephanie Wehmeyer.

Kris uses a dry plate process to document conversations with individuals, retaining the photograph as an artifact of the event. In the final image, it is not the words spoken during the eight-minute capture that remains significant, but the document of the experience. Paula’s work investigates urban spaces, focusing on geometrical shapes and repeated lines that calm the chaos in the city. Raven McCarty’s work investigates cultural identity, where she explores the social norms and rules that determine individual identity. Stephanie’s photographs are a visual sequence of overlapping frames investigating the relationship between a girl and her environment. The black-and-white pinhole effect draws the eye into this relationship with minimal distractions.

Fayetteville, AR. – October 15, 2014 — The University of Arkansas Department of Art presents Luscious: The Body Adorned from November 3 – December 5 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The exhibition includes two artist lectures: Jill Wissmiller on Thursday, October 30th, at 5:30 p.m. in Room 102 of Kimple Hall and Lauren Kalman on Thursday, November 13th, at 5:30pm in Room 102 of Kimple Hall. The Department of Art will host a reception on November 13th at the Fine Arts Center Gallery immediately following the Lauren Kalman lecture.

“The Department of Art at the University of Arkansas is thrilled to include the work of Lauren Kalman, Jon Eric Riss, and Jill Wissmiller in the Luscious exhibition,” said Marc Mitchell, director of exhibitions for the Department. “It is wonderful to see three artists that address beauty and adornment in such different ways and by using diverse media.”

Luscious: The Body Adorned, an exhibition curated by Cynthia Norse Thompson, addresses notions of beauty and adornment employing the human body as a vehicle. Lauren Kalman utilizes metalsmithing as a prop for her performative photographs and videos. Deftly intertwining art and craft, Kalman’s work explores the complex relationship between body image, beauty, and consumer culture. Jon Eric Riis creates monumental tapestries that merge technical prowess with penetrating social commentary. While often featuring mythological, religious, or historical subjects, each tapestry contains cultural information that directly correlates to contemporary society. A common theme throughout all of Jill Wissmiller’s artwork is fixed desire. While often on projecting on glitter-covered panels, Wissmiller creates nontraditional films that foster an environment where the spectator becomes obsessed with the narrative, as well as the material on which the image is projected.

Exhibition view of Stationary Realms

Fayetteville, AR. – August 27, 2014 — The University of Arkansas Department of Art presents Stationary Realms from September 8 – October 24 in the Fine Arts Center Gallery. The exhibition includes an artist lecture Thursday, September 4, at 5:30 p.m. in the Ken and Linda Sue Shollmier Hall, Room 250 of Vol Walker Hall, followed immediately by an artist reception. The events are free, and the public is welcome.

“The Department of Art at the University of Arkansas is thrilled to display the work of outstanding artists Jane Callister, Erin Harmon, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Mary Temple in the Stationary Realms exhibition,” said Marc Mitchell, curator and director of exhibitions for the Department. “While these acclaimed artists are all dealing with the landscape, their artworks address diverse themes within the genre.”

Stationary Realms, an exhibition curated by Cynthia Norse Thompson, addresses issues of place, loss, and beauty through disparate views of the landscape. Each artist in the exhibition utilizes scale and weight to explore both visual and conceptual implications of depicting the environment: Callister’s painterly landscapes deftly intertwine process and imagery; each painting celebrates a material investigation that generates fictional yet enchanting landscapes. Harmon creates carefully orchestrated artworks that emphasize a systematic order that is then applied to her landscapes; like a terrarium, every facet is scrutinized to the point where it becomes synthetic. Steinkamp’s video projections explore the relationship between actual and perceived space. Often focusing on trees and other natural phenomena, Steinkamp creates artworks that blur the line between observation and object. Known best for her installation work, Temple considers the boundaries between fact and fiction. Often presenting the viewer with a shadow on the wall or the silhouette of a plant, Temple creates environments that straddle the line between documentation and fabrication.

work by graduate students

work by graduate students


Summer MFA group exhibition
Fine Arts Center Gallery
May 12- August 29, 2014
Closing reception: Thursday, August 28, 2014 at 5pm

The Fine Arts Center Gallery is pleased to present a group exhibition of current MFA students. The exhibition will present work in a wide range of media including painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture and video. A closing reception will occur on Thursday, August 28, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. Exhibiting are Lindsy Barquist, Wilson Borja, Ashley Byers, Jon Cromer, Drew Divilbiss, Chris Drobnock, Bryanna Jaramillo, Jon McDaniel, Aimee Odum, Todd Pentico, Cambry Pierce, Lauara Polaski, Elena Volkova.

The Department of Art is proud to present the 2014 MFA Thesis Exhibitions:

work by Cambry Lace Pierce

work by Cambry Lace Pierce


Cambry Lace Pierce: The Life You’ve Seen: The Search for Feminine Identity Ruined My Life, Monday, April 14 – Friday April 18, 2014
Reception: Friday, April 18, 2014 at 5pm

“I have become painfully aware and yet also freed by the knowledge of the impossibility to find the center of what makes one “self.” Exposure to the search for identity in the works of 1970’s and 80’s female artists has spurred my thought processes and artistic endeavors. The endless and often subconscious search for the grand query of female identity has left me convoluted. Video images of myself displayed on televisions become twice removed through video and screen, creating fractures within the identity, becoming like oddly shaped puzzle pieces, which one knows will never truly fit together to create a whole. The screen becomes like a mirror of one’s self divorced, both images a lie. I am, and am not, the princess and caretaker, the doting lover and the damaged ex.”
_Cambry Lace Pierce

Wilson Borja

Wilson Borja


Wilson Borja: Chere, Monday, April 21 – Friday April 25, 2014
Reception: Friday, April 25, 2014 at 5pm

“Chere, is a thesis project composed of a series of drawing/paintings and short animations that explores the phenomenon of migration and the African diaspora. Drawing inspiration from African textiles and their African American hybrid forms, quilts, this project examines the process of hybridization as a consequence of migration and its connection with urban distribution based on ethnicity.”

_Wilson Borja

Jon McDaniel

Jon McDaniel


Jon McDaniel: Synthetic Constructive, Monday, April 28 – Friday May 2, 2014, Reception: Friday, May 2, 2014 at 5pm

“The works presented in Synthetic Constructive are oversaturated explorations of shape, form, and color. Though inspired by and constructed from appropriated images and memories from the after effects of devastation, they become more than that as they explore these relationships. It is important that these works, both as collages and as paintings, reflect the search and process of their creation. For me, leaving the ‘tug-o-war’ between representation and abstraction and that of exacting construction and painterly enlightenment is an exciting experience to be viewed. ”

_Jon McDaniel

Lindsy Barquist

Lindsy Barquist


Lindsy Barquist: Anatomies of Melancholy, Monday, May 5 – Friday May 9, 2014, Reception: Friday, May 9 2014 at 5pm

“By combining ideas of traditional oral history with documentary photography this current body of work conveys a tension between the (in)visibility of pain and the need to speak. Through the process of spending time with individuals and discussing their personal trauma while making photographs, I hope to acknowledge and even embalm the pain of others. I am interested in a photograph’s power to console, articulate and offer a map of our experiences. ”

_Lindsy Barquist

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